Blog

12 Jun
0

From the Desk of Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari

OCEAN COUNTY WILL receive a nearly $200,000 Clean Communities Grant from the state Department of Environmental Protection, the largest grant given to a county in 2020, Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari said.

Additionally, the county’s 33 municipalities have been awarded a combined $1.34 million in grants, Vicari said.

“When our towns started questioning when and if they would see Clean Community Grants this year, I took the question directly to the Governor’s Office,” Vicari said. “As recently as this week I’ve spoken with the Governor’s staff about the importance of these grants.”

Ocean County’s award of $196,702 was the single largest amount awarded to any of the state’s 21 counties, according to the DEP.

“I want to thank Gov. Phil Murphy and his staff for ensuring that we were given this money,” Vicari said.

The funds will be used to help municipalities and counties remove litter, to beautify neighborhoods, improve water quality and enhance quality of life.

Vicari said the grants are especially important in Ocean County because of the ongoing effort to protect the Barnegat Bay.

“One of the biggest threats to the bay is nonpoint source pollution and litter that washes into rivers and streams and eventually winds up in the bay,” he said. “This money allows our county and municipalities to not only pick up and prevent litter, but to educate residents and visitors alike about the importance of keeping our communities clean.”

According to the DEP, activities funded by Clean Communities grants include cleanups of storm water systems; volunteer cleanups of public properties; adoption and enforcement of local anti-littering ordinances; beach cleanups; public information and education programs; and purchases of litter collection equipment such as receptacles, recycling bins, anti-litter signs and graffiti removal supplies.

The DEP issued $19.4 million in grants this year, including $17.3 million to towns and $2.1 million to counties statewide.

Ocean County’s five largest municipalities – Lakewood, Toms River, Brick, Jackson, Manchester and Berkeley townships will receive a combined $815,982 in state grants, Vicari said.

Berkeley Township Mayor Carmen F. Amato Jr. thanked Freeholder Director Vicari for his efforts to secure the state funding.

“This money is very important to our town,” Amato said. “I want to personally recognize Freeholder Director Vicari for responding quickly to our concerns and ensuring that Berkeley Township was awarded this grant.”

Amato said the township uses the grant money to hire additional summer staff to clean parks and open spaces.

A complete list of grants to the county’s 33 municipalities follows:

BARNEGAT LIGHT $5,572.21 * BARNEGAT $45,844.02

BAY HEAD $4,894.13 * BEACH HAVEN $12,051.83

BEACHWOOD $21,481.42 * BERKELEY $122,649.46

BRICK $159,486.69 * TOMS RIVER $210,009.22

EAGLESWOOD $4,767.10 * HARVEY CEDARS $5,395.08

ISLAND HEIGHTS $4,266.24 * JACKSON $107,743.09

LACEY $70,425.45 * LAKEHURST $4,622.00

LAKEWOOD $112,530.57 * LAVALLETTE $12,161.41

LITTLE EGG HARBOR $52,720.73 * LONG BEACH $40,256.01

MANCHESTER $103,562.84 * MANTOLOKING $4,000.00

OCEAN GATE $4,154.19 * OCEAN $21,284.47

PINE BEACH $5,289.05 * PLUMSTED $17,370.66

P. PLEASANT BEACH $14,483.32 * POINT PLEASANT $39,711.91

SEASIDE HEIGHTS $10,339.15 * SEASIDE PARK $10,624.71

SHIP BOTTOM $9,270.00 * SOUTH TOMS RIVER $5,634.41

STAFFORD $73,806.29 * SURF CITY $11,184.29

TUCKERTON $8,524.36

TOTAL $1,336,116.31

Read More
09 Jun
0

From the desk of Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari

FLAG DAY HONORS NOT JUST THE RED, WHITE AND BLUE, BUT ALSO OUR NATION AND ALL THOSE WHO UPHOLD ITS IDEALS, FREEHOLDERS SAY

FLAG DAY will be celebrated on June 14 and the Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders wants to remind residents that the day celebrates much more than just a banner.

“On Flag Day we celebrate the cherished meaning behind the Stars and Stripes,” said Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari. “We honor freedom, justice and everyone who upholds the virtues of our nation.”

Vicari said the meaning of Flag Day is even more important in these turbulent times.

“In the past months we’ve seen COVID-19 tear through our communities and curtail some of the freedoms we so dearly treasure,” he said. “We’ve seen protests and individuals exercising their rights to demonstrate against wrongs. But through it all, the American Flag still shines bright, as it always will.”

Vicari said that while he supports everyone’s right to protest, those protests must not include the burning or the defacing of the American Flag.

“As Americans, we must all come together and work shoulder-to-shoulder to improve our nation and our communities,” he said. “There is no place for those who destroy.”

Flag Day was born in 1916 when President Woodrow Wilson issued a Presidential Proclamation declaring June 14 as a day to display and honor the Stars and Stripes.

Vicari said the American Flag has special meaning for him because his late father Hugo was a World War II veteran who fought in the Battle of Bulge.

“For many years I’ve also worked with our veterans on Memorial Day to place American Flags on the grave of every deceased veteran in the county,” he said. “When you honor and respect the flag, you are also honoring the brave men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice defending the freedom the flag represents.”

Read More
04 Jun
0

Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders

FREEHOLDERS PASS RESOLUTION SUPPORTING NEW VETERANS CLINIC IN OCEAN COUNTY

IT IS TIME for the federal government to end “needless delays” and build a new veterans’ clinic in Ocean County.

The Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders unanimously passed a resolution asking the Department of Veterans Affairs to fast track a new facility to replace the aging James J. Howard clinic in Brick Township.

“Our veterans fought for us when we needed them and now we are ready to fight for them,” Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari said. “The facility and the location are simply too small.”

While plans for the clinic seemed to be moving ahead, problems with the federal bidding process led the VA to cancel a contract to build the clinic.

“We cannot let bureaucratic problems derail this important project,” Vicari said.

Vicari said he was contacted by a disabled Vietnam War veteran recently asking the Freeholders to intervene personally with the VA.

“We are working closely with Congressman Chris Smith, who is the senior member of the New Jersey Congressional delegation, and Rep. Andy Kim to fast track this project,” he said.

Vicari said he knows from personal experience how important the VA clinic is to local residents.

“My father was a World War II veteran who fought in the Battle of the Bulge,” he said. “We made frequent trips to the clinic. Having a facility located in Ocean County is critical to our veterans and our senior citizens.”

Freeholder Gerry P. Little said the county is home to one of the largest veterans’ populations in the state, with more than 40,000 veterans living throughout the county’s 33 municipalities.

“Ocean County never forgets our veterans. We will work shoulder-to-shoulder with our Congressional representatives to ensure that this new clinic is built in Ocean County,” he said.

Little, who is liaison to the Ocean County Veteran’s Service Bureau, said the VA needs to explain the reasons behind the latest delay.

“We have been patient, but now it is time to move ahead and get this project done,” he said.

Little’s father is a World War II veteran who served in the Pacific Theater.

Vicari and Little on May 26 sent a letter to Smith and Kim pledging them any assistance the county can offer.

“This may be a federal project, but we want our veterans to know that this Board of Freeholders is doing everything it can to see this plan to fruition,” Vicari said.

Read More
04 Jun
0

From the Desk of Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari

Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders has again voiced their opposition to toll hikes

The Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders has again voiced their opposition to toll hikes on the Garden State Parkway and the New Jersey Turnpike noting the increases do nothing but harm Ocean County commuters already adversely affected by business closures during the coronavirus pandemic.

In a resolution approved by the Board June 3, the Freeholders are strongly urging the Governor to veto the minutes of the Turnpike Authority that approve the toll increase. In addition, Ocean County again is calling for a seat at the table of the Turnpike Authority filling the opening currently on the authority.

“I don’t believe Ocean County’s concerns will be heard until we again have representation on the authority that oversees our toll roads,” said Ocean County Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari. “We are a county of 600,000 residents and a very large percentage of our population are commuters. We need to have a voice on an authority that is willing to take our money and provides little in return.”

Vicari said that toll hikes bring little benefit to the citizens of Ocean County as much of the money collected helps subsidize transportation in northern New Jersey including rail.

“New Jersey has not given Ocean County’s motorists any traveling options,” Vicari said. “This Board has long supported a rail line as a transportation alternative in Ocean County. Yet after years of studies, this has not moved forward by the state.”

Vicari, who also serves as liaison to tourism, said the increase in tolls also will negatively affect the state’s multibillion dollar tourism industry, which is a leading economic engine in Ocean County, providing more than $4.8 billion annually.

Vicari said that it was also important to highlight that the Parkway is used for more than just leisurely travel in Ocean County.

“It’s a designated evacuation route during times of emergencies and Ocean County, as a tourism destination sees its year-round population nearly double, which could result in a million or more people having to use these roads to leave the area during a natural disaster,” he said.

Vicari said that despite the county’s continuing efforts to encourage the state to bring long-needed improvements to Route 9, the other north-south artery in Ocean County – the road has not changed since it was first constructed in the 1920s, with very few areas upgraded, remaining one lane in each travel direction throughout the course of the County.

“Ocean County has been continually informed by state transportation officials that dualization of Route 9 will probably never occur,” Vicari said. “So where does that leave us?”

Vicari suggested the state Legislature consider a New Jersey income tax deduction for commuters who pay at least $500 in toll costs per year as verified by EZ Pass.

“Instead of asking for more maybe there is something the State can do to help our commuters,” Vicari said. “Clearly most people using the parkway and turnpike are doing so to get to and from work. It’s their livelihood and we shouldn’t charge them more for that.”

Read More
02 Jun
0

OCEAN COUNTY’S HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE IS SCHEDULED FOR SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 2020.

Ocean County’s Household Hazardous Waste collection day in Toms River will go on as scheduled. The event is scheduled to run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday June 13, at the Toms River Public Works Garage, 1672 Church Road, here.

“We want to make sure everyone’s safety is a priority as this event moves forward, and it is important that residents follow the guidelines to make this a success,” said Ocean County Freeholder Deputy Director Gary Quinn, who serves as liaison to the Ocean County Department of Solid Waste Management. “Residents dropping off material will remain in their cars essentially making the collection a drive thru in order to limit contact.

“We want to hold this program because we feel we can do it safely and we take great pride in our environment in Ocean County, and this program helps reduce the potential for environmental damage,” Quinn said.

The collection is open to all residents of Ocean County, but businesses and institutions are not eligible. Registration is required either online at www.co.ocean.nj.us/recycle or by calling 732-506-5047.

The following guidelines are in place for the event:

• Residents must wear face coverings.

• Vehicle windows and doors must stay closed throughout the event.

• To check in, hold a Driver’s License up to your closed window.

• Stay in your vehicle at all times.

• Place materials in the vehicle’s trunk or truck bed, workers will remove all items directly and will not enter the interior of your vehicle.

“For over 30 years this program has helped our residents safely dispose of hazardous materials,” said Ocean County Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari. “While it may be a little different this year, we can make this work by following guidelines to protect the public and those working onsite.”

The items that can be dropped off include: aerosols, auto products, batteries, cleaning products, chemicals/pool chemicals, fire extinguishers, gasoline/waste oil, herbicides/pesticides, mercury-containing devices, paint/paint thinners, polyurethanes/polishes, propane/tanks and stains/varnishes.

Items that are not accepted include: asbestos, construction debris, electronics, explosives (including boat flares), infectious waste (“red bag” waste), medications, needles/syringes, oxygen tanks, radioactive materials, smoke detectors and unknown/unidentifiable chemicals.

All materials, with the exception of oil and gasoline, should be in the original containers. A limit of 200 pounds of dry materials and 20 gallons of liquid material is allowed per household. No containers larger than five gallons are accepted.

Read More
27 May
0

MORE DELAYS WITH NEW VETERANS ADMINISTRATION CLINIC IN OCEAN COUNTY

SAYING THAT continued delays in the federal government’s plan to bring a new Veterans Administration clinic to Ocean County are unacceptable, the Board of Chosen Freeholders has vowed to work with Congressional leaders to “cut through the red tape” and do whatever is necessary to fast track the facility.

“Our veterans were there for us when we needed them and now we will be here for them,” said Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari.

The VA has said that a new facility is needed to replace the aging James J. Howard clinic in Brick Township.

“Parking especially remains a problem,” Vicari said. “The facility and the location are simply too small.”

While plans for the clinic seemed to be moving ahead, problems with the federal bidding process led the VA to cancel a contract to build the clinic.

“We cannot let bureaucratic problems derail this important project,” Vicari said.

Vicari said he was contacted by a disabled Vietnam War veteran recently asking the Freeholders to intervene personally with the VA.

“We are working closely with Congressman Chris Smith, who is the senior member of the New Jersey Congressional delegation, and Rep. Andy Kim to fast track this project,” he said.

Vicari said he knows from personal experience how important the VA clinic is to local residents.

“My father was a World War II veteran who fought in the Battle of the Bulge,” he said. “We made frequent trips to the clinic. Having a facility located in Ocean County is critical to our veterans and our senior citizens.

Freeholder Gerry P. Little said the county is home to one of the largest veterans’ populations in the state, with more than 40,000 veterans living throughout the county’s 33 municipalities.

“Ocean County never forgets our veterans. We will work shoulder-to-shoulder with our Congressional representatives to ensure that this new clinic is built in Ocean County,” he said.

Little, who is liaison to the Ocean County Veteran’s Service Bureau, said the VA needs to explain the reasons behind the latest delay.

“We have been patient, but now it is time to move ahead and get this project done,” he said.

Little’s father is a World War II veteran who served in the Pacific Theater.

Vicari and Little on May 26 sent a letter to Smith and Kim pledging them any assistance the county can offer.

“This may be a federal project, but we want our veterans to know that this Board of Freeholders is doing everything it can to see this plan to fruition,” Vicari said.

Read More
26 May
0

Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders – It’s time Small Businesses Open their Doors.

The Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders say it’s time to allow small businesses to open their doors again to the public as long as they are following guidelines and have implemented precautionary measures approved by the state and health experts to assure the safety of the public.

“As the summer season approaches, our small businesses need to be allowed to reopen,” said Ocean County Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari, who is liaison to tourism and business development. “These businesses are owned by our neighbors. They are embedded in our communities and do everything they can to make our towns a better place to live.

“They have been following all the rules and now is the time to allow them to reopen to the public to save their businesses especially as the tourism season gets underway in Ocean County,” Vicari said.

Vicari has been bringing his message to Gov. Murphy and the Governor’s staff as he urges the reopening of these small businesses during a daily conference call with the state’s 20 other counties.

“Tourism is a $4.8 billion business in Ocean County, and while some of these stores are seasonal others are open year-round,” he said. “I am sure that during the time they have been closed to patrons they have taken every step possible to be prepared for reopening under strict sanitary and social distancing guidelines.”

Vicari said that safety is the priority during this time.

“I am not suggesting anyone go against the state executive orders or participate in civil disobedience,” Vicari said. “We don’t want to see anyone’s safety compromised.”

Freeholder Deputy Director Gary Quinn said small business owners want to get back to one thing – running their small businesses.

Quinn said all of the freeholders have been responding to calls from small business owners that are growing more and more concerned about possibly losing their business if they can’t open soon.

“If these businesses can’t open between now and July 4th they could very well become a statistic,” Quinn said. “They won’t survive.”

“It’s probably just as safe to walk into any small business that lines Main Street as it is a big box store,” Quinn said. “These small businesses are willing to limit their number of customers, and provide safety measures for the public and their workers.”

Ocean County Freeholder Virginia E. Haines agreed.

“Our small businesses want to do the right thing,” she said.

Ocean County Freeholder John P. Kelly, who operates a small business in Eagleswood Township, said it’s time for the state to open other small businesses. His hardware store has remained open during the pandemic as allowed by the state’s executive order.

“During the closure small businesses still have to pay rent or mortgages,” he said. “The state has been showing flexibility allowing more businesses to open. Now is the time to move forward safely allowing small businesses to open.”

Freeholder Gerry P. Little said small businesses are the heart of the economy at the Jersey Shore.

“This doesn’t affect just Ocean County though it affects everyone,” he said. “It’s time to get the local, county, state and national economy back on track. We can do it safely and within guidelines that will also protect patrons and workers.”

Vicari urged residents and visitors to patronize the small businesses located throughout the County.

“Please go to their websites order food, clothing, jewelry, gift cards or whatever you might be looking for,” he said. “You can get the merchandise with curbside delivery or by take out or other means.

“Now more than ever our small businesses need every one of us,” he said. “We can’t forget all they do for us throughout the year whether donating to charities, providing gifts for auctions, supporting our schools and sporting events and being a big part of our volunteer emergency response teams. Now is the time to shop small and buy local.”

For more details please visit the Ocean County website – www.ocean.nj.us/home

Read More
20 May
0

Ocean County to Welcome Beachgoers for the Memorial Day Weekend

OCEAN COUNTY is ready to welcome beachgoers for the long Memorial Day weekend, but officials said social distancing measures enacted by Gov. Phil Murphy will be in place.

“All of our oceanfront towns have opened their beaches prior to the holiday, but we ask everyone to be aware of and follow the rules,” said Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari, liaison to tourism.

Every beach will require visitors to practice social distancing and remain at least six feet apart. The restriction does not apply to families, caregivers or romantic partners.

Other towns have enacted rules prohibiting certain activities on the beach, such as swimming.

“We want everyone to enjoy themselves and all Ocean County has to offer,” Vicari said. “But to ensure that the beaches remain open throughout the season, visitors and locals alike need to make adjustments for the summer of 2020.”

Some towns are still revising their beach rules and may make last-minute changes as the weekend gets closer.

“Like our good friends in Monmouth County I ask everyone to ‘know before you go’. I urge everyone to check with the municipality you are visiting to see if any revisions have been made,” Vicari said.
A listing of all county municipal websites is available on the Ocean County Homepage at http://www.co.ocean.nj.us.

The Ocean County Health Department is also doing its part to ensure bathers have a healthy summer.
The department has begun its annual beach testing programs, which surveys ocean, bay, river and lake swimming beaches weekly throughout the season to make sure the waters are clean and safe for swimming.

“We will test every swimming beach that is open from May through Labor Day,” said Gerry P. Little, liaison to the Ocean County Health Department. “Our staff is ready to respond the moment a municipality decides to allow swimming at any given beach.”

A list of municipal beaches and any restrictions in place follows:

Northern Barrier Island:
• Bay Head: Beaches are open with social distancing restrictions. Beach badges are required as of June 20 and can be purchased in-person or online through the Bay Head Improvement Authority. Seasonal, half-season and daily badges are available.
Website: http://bayheadnj.org Phone: (732) 892-0636

• Berkeley Township and South Seaside Park: Beaches are open but strict social distancing measures are in place.
Berkeley Township website: www.berkeleytownship.org Phone: (732) 244-7400

• Brick Township: Brick Beach 1 and Windward Beach Park will be open to swimming on Memorial Day weekend. All beaches will be open daily beginning June 15 and will be subject to new safety measures put in place for the ongoing pandemic crisis. Seasonal badges can be purchased by calling the Recreation Department at 732-262-1044. Only check or credit cards will be accepted. The number of daily beach badges sold will be limited and cash will be accepted for daily badges and parking permits.
Website: http://www.twp.brick.nj.us Phone: (732) 262-1000

• Lavallette: Beaches are open for running, walking, fishing, and sitting. Strict social distancing must be practiced. The Boardwalk will open May 22 for walking and exercising.
Website: http://www.lavallette.org Phone: (732) 793-7477

• Mantoloking: Beaches are open. Badges are required as of June 20 and are sold by mail or at the badge trailer on Downer Avenue. Seasonal badges are $75 and no cash will be accepted.
Website: http://www.mantoloking.org Phone: (732) 475-6983

• Point Pleasant Beach: The Maryland Avenue Municipal Beach is open but restrictions on parking and the number of daily badges available are in place. Seasonal badges may be purchased online. Beach Associations have also been given the option of opening and most have chosen to do so. Only residents with placards are permitted to park on any street east of the railroad tracks. The boardwalk and Jenkinson’s Beach remained closed, but their status may be updated in the near future.
Website: http://www.pointpleasantbeach.org Phone: (732) 892-1118

• Seaside Heights: Beaches are open from 7am to 5pm with limited entry points. A seasonal or senior beach badge will be required beginning May 23. Daily badges will not be sold on the Boardwalk. No swimming is allowed. The Boardwalk is also open but will be cleared at 11 p.m. Social distancing is required for both the beach and Boardwalk. Facemasks are encouraged and Public restrooms will be open on a limited basis. All public and private parking spaces will be reduced by 50 percent.
Website: http://www.seaside-heightsnj.org Phone: (732) 793-9100

• Seaside Park: Both the beach and boardwalk are open with social distancing required. Beach badges are required on weekends only through June 29. After that date, badges are required daily. Daily badges may be limited to prevent overcrowding. Public restrooms will be open during beach operations. The Beach Control building on the boardwalk between N and O streets will be open for in-person purchases and badge pick up. Cash will not be accepted, only checks and credit cards.
Website: www.seasideparknj.org Phone: (732) 793-3700

• Toms River Township/Ortley Beach: The beaches and boardwalk are open with restrictions. Ortley Beach will be manned by lifeguards on Memorial Day weekend and weekends of June 6-7, June 13-14 and full-time commencing on June 20th. Beach badges are on sale at the Recreation Administration Office, 1810 Warren Pointe Road, Toms River, Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The pre-season reduced price will be extended until June 19th. Full season beach badges are $35 at the pre-season rate and $50 after June 19th.
Website: http://www.tomsrivertownship.com Phone: (732) 341-1000

Long Beach Island:
• Barnegat Light: Beaches remain open and badges are available online via the borough’s website.Website: http://www.BarnegatLight.org Phone: (609) 494-9196

• Beach Haven: Beaches and restrooms are open. Badges are available via an app on the borough’s website or at the Centre Street badge office.
Website: http://beachhaven-nj.gov Phone: (609) 492-0111

• Harvey Cedars: Preseason beach badges may be purchased through the borough’s website.
Website: www.harveycedars.org Phone: (609) 361-6000

• Long Beach Township: Beaches are open and seasonal beach badges can be purchased at The Beach Badge Shack on 68th Street, Brant Beach and at other locations listed on the township’s website. Badges are required on township beaches from June 1 to September 7.
Website: http://www.longbeachtownship.com Phone: (609) 361-1000

• Ship Bottom: Beach badges are for sale online and at Town Hall and are available at preseason rates through May 31.
Website: http://www.shipbottom.org Phone: (609) 494-2171

• Surf City: The borough never closed its beaches. Badges are available at Borough Hall and preseason rates are in effect through May 31.
Website: www.surfcitynj.org Phone: (609) 494-3064

While the decision to open or close beaches is a municipal one, Gov. Murphy has issued broad guidelines to keep beachgoers safe such as capacity limitations decided upon by local officials, specifically, limiting the number of beach badges sold or electronically monitoring the number of people present on a beach; social distancing measures; no large gatherings; rides and arcades will remain closed; and showers and restrooms may open, but with strict cleaning standards.

Freeholder Director Vicari again asked everyone to obey the rules.
“This is a learning experience for all of us,” he said. “Please be considerate of other families on the beach.”
Vicari said despite the necessary restrictions, 2020 still has the makings of a memorable summer at the Jersey Shore.
“Working together we can make this a great summer and end the season with treasured memories of Ocean County,” he said.

Read More
18 May
0

From the Desk of Ocean County Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari

Pumpout Boat Program Preparing to Launch Memorial Day Weekend

“People can still get out on the water,” said Ocean County Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari, who is liaison to the popular environmental program. “While there will be new protocols in place for our boat captains and social distancing requirements for boaters due to the coronavirus pandemic, we still need to make sure we protect our waterways and provide boaters with a means to properly dispose onboard wastewater.

“This summer we will be stressing more than ever the importance of safety for our captains and the boaters,” Vicari said. “It’s still remains imperative that we do all we can to curtail the spread of the coronavirus, but we also know people want to get out of the house and back on the water.”

The pumpout boats are specially equipped vessels capable of emptying the on-board toilets and tanks of other boats, keeping waste from entering the bay. The boats are available to provide the pumpout service on weekends starting Memorial Day weekend running through October.

To request a pumpout, the boats can be contacted on VHF radio channel 9, or by contacting the captains by cell phone. The contact numbers for the captains can be found on the program’s website at www.planning.co.ocean.nj.us/frmEPPumpoutBoats.

Boaters are also encouraged to like the pumpout program’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pumpoutoceancounty for up to date announcements and contact information.

“There are now six full-time pumpout boats operating in the Barnegat Bay and the Little Egg Harbor, in addition to the Circle of Life which was the first pumpout boat in New Jersey and continues to be operated as a part-time back-up boat and during the peak season.

“With miles and miles of waterways to enjoy, Ocean County operates the largest pumpout boat program in the state,” Vicari said. The six full-time boats were all purchased by Ocean County. The purchasing costs were reimbursed through the Clean Vessel Act Grant and the New Jersey Shore-to-Please license plate program. These same programs fund the installation of fixed pumpout stations at marinas throughout coastal New Jersey.

For more in depth details and protocols please visit the Ocean County website – www.ocean.nj.us/home

Read More
15 May
0

The Ocean County Board of Chosen Freeholders will proclaim the month of May as Police Memorial Month in Ocean County and May 15 Police Memorial Day.

“Every year we gather at this time at the Ocean County Police Academy in Ocean County Park to pay tribute to the fallen heroes that have proudly served this County,” said Ocean County Freeholder John P. Kelly, Director of Law and Public Safety. “We take time to remember their service and recognize their loved ones. And while we cannot gather at the academy memorial right now, Ocean County will recognize the men and women whose names grace the monument.”
In the absence of a public ceremony, a wreath and flowers will be placed at the Police Memorial Monument at 10 a.m. Friday, May 15 by Harvey Cedars Police Chief Robert Burnaford, President of the Ocean County Police Chiefs Association and Retired Bay Head Police Chief William Dikun, who has served as the master of ceremonies of the annual ceremony.

“On Friday, I want to encourage all of our residents to take time to remember the lives of Ocean County’s fallen officers – the men and women that have made the ultimate sacrifice,” Kelly said. “Their service will never be forgotten. While we cannot be at the police memorial monument, we certainly can keep them in our thoughts and our prayers.”

Ocean County Sheriff Michael G. Mastronardy extended his gratitude to all law enforcement and peace officers during the ongoing national health crises.

“Every year we recognize the dedication and the sacrifice of all men and women of law enforcement who are no longer with us,” Mastronardy said. “We recall the important work of those who made the ultimate sacrifice and we extend our appreciation to the families and loved ones they left behind. That recognition doesn’t end because a formal ceremony cannot be held.

“I ask that you keep all of our law enforcement and emergency responders in your thoughts as they protect the public from a virus we cannot see but know how much damage it can do,” he said.

For more details, please visit the Ocean County website – www.ocean.nj.us/home

Read More
1236